5 habits can trigger anxiety

depression

5 habits can trigger anxiety

You have the feeling that you have to give a lecture in front of a lot of people or have a job interview in a few moments – but neither is the case? Instead of being easygoing and relaxed, are you constantly energized and finding it difficult to rest? You’re not alone. Research has shown that certain habits in our everyday life can cause or increase states of nervousness and anxiety . The good thing about it: Once you have identified the stress factors, you can take good action against them.

1. Check social media constantly
Therapist Kailee Place explains to the online magazine Bustle : “Regularly checking social media accounts triggers anxiety in many people”. It would lead us to unconsciously constantly comparing ourselves to others and feeling like we are not good enough or lagging behind. The expert therefore recommends always remembering that everything we see on social networks is staged and taking regular breaks.

2. Consume news
Push messages here, radio reports there: News about current world events is often really overwhelming and often depressing. Especially in times like these, taking a break from the news can be good for your mental health . When we find ourselves feeling increasingly worse and more helpless, therapist Place says it’s time to take a break.

3. Sharing with other nervous people
Of course, it is very important for general well-being to exchange thoughts and feelings with others – but it can also have negative effects, namely if the other person suffers from severe anxiety and nervousness. “As humans, we are strongly influenced by the feelings and energies of others. If the person we are talking to is very anxious and stressed, this can affect our mood,” says Place. It helps to be aware and to keep your distance if necessary.

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4. Too little sleep
Sleep is essential for both our physical and mental health. If we sleep badly or not enough, it has a strong impact on our stress level. Therapist Place recommends developing an evening routine to help wind down and fall asleep after a busy day.

5. Shopping or otherwise distracting yourself
Most of us have probably shopped for frustration and tried to salvage a bad day by buying a new piece of clothing (which, in fact, we probably didn’t really need). However, expert Place explicitly advises against this: It is a form of avoidance or procrastination . Instead of trying to distract ourselves from uncomfortable feelings, Place says we should deal with them. Admittedly, spontaneous purchases would give us a brief dopamine high, but if this fizzles out, our anxiety usually only gets worse.

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