5 ways relationships affect our health

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5 ways relationships affect our health

A study from Princeton and Northwestern University shows how relationships can affect our health. The researchers examined the data of over 14,000 Americans in different age groups.

Criteria such as social support (e.g. the reliability of family members), social integration (e.g. the frequency of contact with others) and social tension (e.g. how often one is criticized by friends) were measured. This was then linked to health factors such as blood pressure and BMI.

Overall, the researchers found that more socially integrated individuals and individuals whose relationships are of higher quality are also healthier. The most important results at a glance:

5 ways relationships affect our health

1: Subjects had lower blood pressure when they spent more time with others.

2: In young people, the risk of being overweight is much lower if they are socially integrated.

Myth 3: Adults are less likely to be overweight when they have plenty of social support to fall back on.

4: Adults are conversely more likely to be overweight when there is a lot of social tension in their lives.

5: Older people are much more likely to develop high blood pressure if they spend less time with others, i.e. are less socially integrated.

This study is the first large-scale, long-term study of the health consequences of relationships. She shows that relationships have a major impact on our bodies.

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