What are the 7 pillars of resilience?

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What are the 7 pillars of resilience?

Psychologists distinguish between seven pillars or sub-areas that contribute to one’s own resilience. The more these are developed and strengthened, the better prepared you are for stressful situations and crises.

There are experiences or situations that shake up your own life, that pull the rug out from under your feet, where suddenly nothing is the way it used to be – be it through the loss of a job or a loved one, a separation or the diagnosis of a serious illness. Some quarrel for a long time or even break down because of the changed living conditions, while others manage to integrate the new into their own lives and grow in such times of crisis.

According to modern psychology, the difference lies in one’s own ability to be resilient. Psychologists distinguish seven pillars or sub-areas that contribute to one’s own resilience, i.e. one’s own mental resilience. The more these are developed and strengthened, the better prepared you are for stressful situations and crises. You can find out what they are here:

1. Optimism
Anyone who can see something good in personal defeats or the most difficult moments is not easily discouraged. A sentence by Oscar Wilde describes this inner attitude very well: “Everything will be fine in the end. And if it’s not good yet, then it’s not the end.” A happiness journal, for example, helps those who don’t do so well to perceive the positive things in life more consciously.

2. Acceptance
Accepting things as they are – especially situations that cannot be changed (anymore) – is often the first step out of the deep valley. Only those who have integrated their own destiny into their lives can begin to tackle the problems and become capable of acting again.

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3. Solution-oriented goals
By having a clear, meaningful goal in mind, you automatically look ahead. The way there is seen as an enrichment, and that helps to overcome difficult situations.

4. Leave victim role
As a victim you feel powerless and alone. Anyone who leaves the role of victim deals with the current circumstances and develops solutions on how to actively change the situation for the better.

5. Take responsibility
By being “in control” again, one can look at the stressful situation objectively and recognize one’s own influence and act accordingly – and possibly also realistically assess whether one has contributed to the current crisis.

6. Close ties
Forming close relationships and truly confiding in someone creates an important safety net for difficult times; it also helps to overcome crises more calmly. Maintaining relationships, paying attention to your family, partner and friends – this also increases your own self-esteem and inner strength.

7. Positive future planning
A positive view of the future, planning in advance for any crises that may arise, such as divorce or debt (and what you would do in that case), as well as knowing that you always have a choice and that you are not helplessly at the mercy of your fate, but can actively take countermeasures – All of this helps in advance to get through a crisis better.

Take a piece of paper and write down your personal sources of strength in three columns. Write “everything out” – without thinking about it long:

Things and activities that do you good (quickly): take a bath, put on warm socks, buy yourself flowers, go to the bookstore and browse, enjoy a hot cup of coffee, pet your pet, listen to your favorite music…

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People who nourish and respect you: your best friend, your colleague, an old acquaintance abroad – and the names of people who have helped or stood by you in a situation before…

Write down the names, addresses and telephone numbers of experts and professionals (professional helpers): general practitioners, therapists, counselors, counseling institutes, counseling facilities, self-help groups, groups in social networks.

Keep this list where you can access it at all times so that it can be used as a resource-boosting “first aid” in an emergency.

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