Why dental problems affect our whole body

dental-care

Why dental problems affect our whole body

Imagine waking up every day with a headache . You drink enough, actually sleep well, are healthy and exercise regularly. Nevertheless, there is this dull feeling in my head every morning. Has it ever occurred to you that the teeth could be to blame? Dentist and author Annette Jasper has been dealing with unusual patient stories for years and has recorded some of them in her book Verzahnt. Her message: “Everything in our organism works in control loops. Whether a person is healthy or sick depends on the extent to which his system is in balance. Every disturbance affects the whole.”

Teeth and organs – a complex structure
Each tooth in our mouth is assigned to an organ. The incisors are connected to the kidneys and bladder, the canines to the lungs and large intestine, and the molars to the stomach, spleen, heart and small intestine. As the? “Our teeth are connected to our body via our cells and connective tissue. The transmission of stimuli works like an electric wire,” says Annette Jasper. If a tooth is missing, has been replaced or individual teeth are diseased, what is actually a perfect system gets out of step. There are also problems that arise due to the germs that enter the body through a diseased tooth or periodontal pocket – and a huge group of functional problems that arise when the bite is not right or when stress is relieved with the teeth, such as grinding teeth .

What diseases have to do with teeth
The headache patient in Annette Jasper’s book suffers from TMD, which stands for craniomandibular dysfunction, a disorder of the masticatory system, and is widespread, although most of us have never heard of it. The symptoms are so diverse that they are often recognized very late for this very reason. If pressure is constantly exerted on the spinal cord via the very strong jaw muscles, this can impair blood circulation in the brain and irritate nerves in the inner ear – you already have a feeling of dizziness. Earache or even hearing loss can also result. The cause is almost always a displacement of the cervical vertebra. Degree of danger for office workers: high. It is difficult for us to control this type of misalignment of the jaw. Most of the time we don’t even realize that we often sit in the same position at the computer for hours, clenching our teeth, tensing our jaws or pushing them forward unnaturally. A tense chewing muscle is therefore almost certain.

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But also back pain up to the “herniated disc” in the jaw can be the result. As always, however, dental problems make themselves felt in the body. How long it takes for them to be recognized for what they are varies widely. “Very few people go straight to a dentist when they have physical problems. That’s why months to years often pass before the tooth focus is discovered and then treated with other processes in the organism,” says Jasper. So it’s worth listening to your body and thinking outside the box when you’re in pain. And in dental care factual knowledge is preferable to myths anyway.

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